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Fistulas

A fistula is a pathological connection between organs, blood vessels, or other structures in the body. Fistulas develop after an accident or surgical procedure. A fistula may also develop because of an infection or inflammation.

Fistula Formation

The body is full of potential entry points for fistulas. Their formations are possible between:

  • Venous and arterial systems
  • The skin’s epidermis and bile ducts (from gallbladder surgery)
  • Intimate anatomical structures, specifically the cervix and vagina
  • Regions of the neck and throat
  • Between the bones of the skull and the nasal cavities.
  • Colon and vaginal
  • The colon and the skin, resulting in defecation passing through a route other than the anus.
  • The gut and the skin’s surface
  • Peritoneal space and uterus (the space between the walls of the abdomen and internal organs)
  • An arterial and venous system in the lungs (results in blood not picking up enough oxygen in the lungs)
  • A region between the belly button and the abdominal wall

Fistulas can form between sections of the intestine if the patient suffers from inflammatory bowel disease like Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis. Fistulas between the arteries and veins may develop after an injury.

Types

Some examples of fistulas are:

  • Blind (open on one end only, but connects to two structures)
  • Complete (has openings both outside and inside the body)
  • Horseshoe (connects the anus to the surface of the skin after going around the rectum)
  • Incomplete (a tube from the skin that is closed on the inside and does not connect to any internal structure)

Signs

Symptoms of an anal fistula include recurring perianal abscesses or intermittent or constant drainage of mucus, blood, pus, or feces onto the perineum.

Diagnosis

An external perineal opening may be visible, either completely open or concealed by granulation tissue. On digital rectal examination, a fibrous tract may be palpable under the skin.

Most fistula are initially evaluated with MRI imaging, utilized to visualize the anatomy of the tract, unless the patient is experiencing an emergency (such as anorectal abscess). The results of this can inform the strategy behind any necessary surgical procedure.

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At Complex Healthcare Solutions, our care team’s approach is to collaborate with your treatment to address any existing conditions you are currently suffering. Our specialists will work to create a complete treatment plan suited to you to heal and fully recover quickly.

To make an appointment with our healthcare professional and specialists, submit your appointment request or call us at +1-817-386-8886.

Fistulas

A fistula is a pathological connection between organs, blood vessels, or other structures in the body. Fistulas develop after an accident or surgical procedure. A fistula may also develop because of an infection or inflammation.

The body is full of potential entry points for fistulas. Their formations are possible between:

  • Venous and arterial systems
  • The skin’s epidermis and bile ducts (from gallbladder surgery)
  • Intimate anatomical structures, specifically the cervix and vagina
  • Regions of the neck and throat
  • Between the bones of the skull and the nasal cavities.
  • Colon and vaginal
  • The colon and the skin, resulting in defecation passing through a route other than the anus.
  • The gut and the skin’s surface
  • Peritoneal space and uterus (the space between the walls of the abdomen and internal organs)
  • An arterial and venous system in the lungs (results in blood not picking up enough oxygen in the lungs)
  • A region between the belly button and the abdominal wall

Fistulas can form between sections of the intestine if the patient suffers from inflammatory bowel disease like Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis. Fistulas between the arteries and veins may develop after an injury.

Some examples of fistulas are:

  • Blind (open on one end only, but connects to two structures)
  • Complete (has openings both outside and inside the body)
  • Horseshoe (connects the anus to the surface of the skin after going around the rectum)
  • Incomplete (a tube from the skin that is closed on the inside and does not connect to any internal structure)

Symptoms of an anal fistula include recurring perianal abscesses or intermittent or constant drainage of mucus, blood, pus, or feces onto the perineum.

An external perineal opening may be visible, either completely open or concealed by granulation tissue. On digital rectal examination, a fibrous tract may be palpable under the skin.

Most fistula are initially evaluated with MRI imaging, utilized to visualize the anatomy of the tract, unless the patient is experiencing an emergency (such as anorectal abscess). The results of this can inform the strategy behind any necessary surgical procedure.

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