Hospital Risk Share

Complex Healthcare will provide hospital based programs the opportunity to Share Risk with us

Learn More

Joint Ventures

Complex Healthcare welcomes the opportunity to work with physicians and physician groups

Learn More

Revenue Cycle Management

Complex Healthcare has a growing staff of professional billers, coders, and collection personnel.

Learn More

Safe-D-Net

Complex Healthcare helps fill the voids in your Wound Care programs..

Learn More

What is a Pressure Ulcer?

Previously called decubitus or bed sore, a pressure ulcer is the result of damage caused by pressure over time causing an ischemia of underlying structures. Bony prominences are the most common sites and causes.

There are many risk factors that contribute to the development of pressure ulcers. CMS (2004) recommends patients in LTC be assessed for risk on admission, weekly for the first four weeks then reassessed quarterly

When to Get Medical Advice

If you’re in the hospital or a care home, tell your healthcare team as soon as possible if you develop symptoms of a pressure ulcer. It’ll probably continue to get worse if nothing is done about it.

You should be regularly monitored and offered advice and treatment to reduce the risk of pressure ulcers, but sometimes they can develop even with the highest standards of care.

If you’re recovering from illness or surgery at home, or you’re caring for someone confined to bed or who is a wheelchair user, contact your GP surgery if you think you or the person you’re caring for might have a pressure ulcer.

Get medical advice immediately if there is: 

  • red, swollen skin
  • pus coming from the pressure ulcer or wound
  • cold skin and a fast heartbeat
  • severe or worsening pain
  • a high temperature

These symptoms could be a sign of a serious infection that needs to be treated as soon as possible.

Treatments for Pressure Ulcers

Treatments for pressure ulcers depend on how severe they are.

For some people, they’re an inconvenience that needs basic nursing care. For others, they can be serious and lead to life-threatening complications, such as blood poisoning.

Ways to stop pressure ulcers getting worse and help them heal include:

  • Applying dressings that speed up the healing process and may help to relieve pressure
  • Moving and regularly changing your position
  • Using specially designed static foam mattresses or cushions, or dynamic mattresses and cushions that have a pump to provide a constant flow of air
  • Eating a healthy, balanced diet
  • Aprocedure to clean the wound and remove damaged tissue (debridement)
  • Surgery to remove damaged tissue and close the wound is sometimes used in the most serious cases.

When to See a Doctor

If you notice warning signs of a bedsore, change your position to relieve the pressure on the area. If you don’t see improvement in 24 to 48 hours, contact your doctor.

Seek immediate medical care if you show signs of infection, such as a fever, drainage from a sore, a sore that smells bad, changes in skin color, warmth or swelling around a sore.

Ready for an appointment?

At Complex Healthcare Solutions, our care team’s approach is to collaborate with your treatment to address any existing conditions you are currently suffering. Our specialists will work to create a complete treatment plan suited to you to heal and fully recover quickly.

To make an appointment with our healthcare professional and specialists, submit your appointment request or call us at +1-817-386-8886.

What is a Pressure Ulcer?

Previously called decubitus or bed sore, a pressure ulcer is the result of damage caused by pressure over time causing an ischemia of underlying structures. Bony prominences are the most common sites and causes.

There are many risk factors that contribute to the development of pressure ulcers. CMS (2004) recommends patients in LTC be assessed for risk on admission, weekly for the first four weeks then reassessed quarterly

If you’re in the hospital or a care home, tell your healthcare team as soon as possible if you develop symptoms of a pressure ulcer. It’ll probably continue to get worse if nothing is done about it.

You should be regularly monitored and offered advice and treatment to reduce the risk of pressure ulcers, but sometimes they can develop even with the highest standards of care.

If you’re recovering from illness or surgery at home, or you’re caring for someone confined to bed or who is a wheelchair user, contact your GP surgery if you think you or the person you’re caring for might have a pressure ulcer.

Get medical advice immediately if there is: 

  • red, swollen skin
  • pus coming from the pressure ulcer or wound
  • cold skin and a fast heartbeat
  • severe or worsening pain
  • a high temperature

These symptoms could be a sign of a serious infection that needs to be treated as soon as possible.

Treatments for pressure ulcers depend on how severe they are.

For some people, they’re an inconvenience that needs basic nursing care. For others, they can be serious and lead to life-threatening complications, such as blood poisoning.

Ways to stop pressure ulcers getting worse and help them heal include:

  • Applying dressings that speed up the healing process and may help to relieve pressure
  • Moving and regularly changing your position
  • Using specially designed static foam mattresses or cushions, or dynamic mattresses and cushions that have a pump to provide a constant flow of air
  • Eating a healthy, balanced diet
  • Aprocedure to clean the wound and remove damaged tissue (debridement)
  • Surgery to remove damaged tissue and close the wound is sometimes used in the most serious cases.

If you notice warning signs of a bedsore, change your position to relieve the pressure on the area. If you don’t see improvement in 24 to 48 hours, contact your doctor.

Seek immediate medical care if you show signs of infection, such as a fever, drainage from a sore, a sore that smells bad, changes in skin color, warmth or swelling around a sore.

Find a Clinic

Look for a Complex Healthcare Solutions accredited wound care clinic near you.

Find a Clinic Near You

Appointments

Request an appointment by sending a message or by calling us now at 817-386-8886.

Call Now