Hospital Risk Share

Complex Healthcare will provide hospital based programs the opportunity to Share Risk with us

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Joint Ventures

Complex Healthcare welcomes the opportunity to work with physicians and physician groups

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Revenue Cycle Management

Complex Healthcare has a growing staff of professional billers, coders, and collection personnel.

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Safe-D-Net

Complex Healthcare helps fill the voids in your Wound Care programs..

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Stump and Amputation Wounds

A stump wound is a wound that is caused by the removal of a limb through amputation. It is typically a deep, bloody wound that extends all the way down to the bone. Stump wounds are very painful and can take weeks or even months to heal properly. In some cases, they can become infected, which can lead to serious complications. Amputation wounds are also very dangerous because they can easily become infected. If an infection occurs, it can quickly spread to the rest of the body and cause sepsis, which is a life-threatening condition. It is important to seek immediate medical attention if you think you have an infection in your stump wound.

Complex HealthCare Solutions’ plastic and reconstructive surgeon provide proper treatment for the procedure for amputations and health-related issues.

Pre-Surgical Evaluation

  • The state of nutrition
  • General system review – Cardiovascular and Respiratory
  • Diabetes Control If it is necessary
  • Previous medical history
  • Bowel & Bladder Function
  • Health and Strength of the limb
  • Premorbid mobility
  • Psychological assessment to assess the emotional consequences of the amputation
  • Social historiography
  • Assessment of the workplace and home to ensure that everything conforms to the self-reliance of the patient to its maximum
  • Explanation of the post-operative regimen.

Amputation, Diabetes, and Vascular Disease

About 54% of operations requiring amputations result from complications from vascular diseases and other conditions that impact blood flow, like diabetes and peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

Chronic vascular issues can cause tissue death in the feet, toes, and legs. Almost half will pass five years after the procedure when patients undergo amputations because of complications from these diseases.

Surgical Approaches to Amputation

Amputation is the removal of a limb or extremity by trauma, prolonged constriction, infection, or surgery. As a last resort, amputation may be performed to remove an irreversibly diseased or damaged limb. Surgical approaches to amputation have evolved over time in order to minimize blood loss, lower the risk of infection, and promote healing. The most common type of amputation today is a transcutaneous amputation, which is performed through an incision in the skin. Another common approach is a periosteal amputation, in which the bone is severed and the soft tissue is left intact. In some cases, it may also be necessary to perform an ostectomy, in which part of the bone is removed along with the soft tissue. Amputations are complex procedures that require careful planning and execution. However, they may be lifesaving in certain circumstances.

The Amputation Surgery Team of Complex Healthcare Solutions

Our Orthopedic and oncologic surgeons collaborate alongside plastic and reconstructive surgeons and various surgical technologists and nurses to carry out an operation for surgical amputation. Together, they will remove the injured body part and use the remaining bone and tissue from the stump. The surgical team might shape the soft tissue near the end of the limb to fit a prosthetic device or keep bone in place for the subsequent process of osseointegration (OI).

Healing and Wound Care After Amputation

After an amputation, it is important to take care of the wound and monitor for infection. The wound will likely be covered with a dressing, which will need to be changed regularly. It is also important to keep the wound clean and dry, and to make sure that it does not become too tight or too loose. The stump will also need to be regularly inspected for signs of infection. In addition, it is important to keep the area around the stump clean and free from any potential irritants. Complex Healthcare Solutions can provide you with expert guidance on how to care for your wound and stump after an amputation. We can also provide you with the necessary supplies and equipment to help you heal properly. Contact us today to learn more about our healing and wound care services.

Ready for an appointment?

At Complex Healthcare Solutions, our care team’s approach is to collaborate with your treatment to address any existing conditions you are currently suffering. Our specialists will work to create a complete treatment plan suited to you to heal and fully recover quickly.

To make an appointment with our healthcare professional and specialists, submit your appointment request or call us at +1-817-386-8886.

Stump and Amputation Wounds

A stump wound is a wound that is caused by the removal of a limb through amputation. It is typically a deep, bloody wound that extends all the way down to the bone. Stump wounds are very painful and can take weeks or even months to heal properly. In some cases, they can become infected, which can lead to serious complications. Amputation wounds are also very dangerous because they can easily become infected. If an infection occurs, it can quickly spread to the rest of the body and cause sepsis, which is a life-threatening condition. It is important to seek immediate medical attention if you think you have an infection in your stump wound.

Complex HealthCare Solutions’ plastic and reconstructive surgeon provide proper treatment for the procedure for amputations and health-related issues.

  • The state of nutrition
  • General system review – Cardiovascular and Respiratory
  • Diabetes Control If it is necessary
  • Previous medical history
  • Bowel & Bladder Function
  • Health and Strength of the limb
  • Premorbid mobility
  • Psychological assessment to assess the emotional consequences of the amputation
  • Social historiography
  • Assessment of the workplace and home to ensure that everything conforms to the self-reliance of the patient to its maximum
  • Explanation of the post-operative regimen.

About 54% of operations requiring amputations result from complications from vascular diseases and other conditions that impact blood flow, like diabetes and peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

Chronic vascular issues can cause tissue death in the feet, toes, and legs. Almost half will pass five years after the procedure when patients undergo amputations because of complications from these diseases.

Amputation is the removal of a limb or extremity by trauma, prolonged constriction, infection, or surgery. As a last resort, amputation may be performed to remove an irreversibly diseased or damaged limb. Surgical approaches to amputation have evolved over time in order to minimize blood loss, lower the risk of infection, and promote healing. The most common type of amputation today is a transcutaneous amputation, which is performed through an incision in the skin. Another common approach is a periosteal amputation, in which the bone is severed and the soft tissue is left intact. In some cases, it may also be necessary to perform an ostectomy, in which part of the bone is removed along with the soft tissue. Amputations are complex procedures that require careful planning and execution. However, they may be lifesaving in certain circumstances.

Our Orthopedic and oncologic surgeons collaborate alongside plastic and reconstructive surgeons and various surgical technologists and nurses to carry out an operation for surgical amputation. Together, they will remove the injured body part and use the remaining bone and tissue from the stump. The surgical team might shape the soft tissue near the end of the limb to fit a prosthetic device or keep bone in place for the subsequent process of osseointegration (OI).

After an amputation, it is important to take care of the wound and monitor for infection. The wound will likely be covered with a dressing, which will need to be changed regularly. It is also important to keep the wound clean and dry, and to make sure that it does not become too tight or too loose. The stump will also need to be regularly inspected for signs of infection. In addition, it is important to keep the area around the stump clean and free from any potential irritants. Complex Healthcare Solutions can provide you with expert guidance on how to care for your wound and stump after an amputation. We can also provide you with the necessary supplies and equipment to help you heal properly. Contact us today to learn more about our healing and wound care services.

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Appointments

Request an appointment by sending a message or by calling us now at 817-386-8886.

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