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Revenue Cycle Management

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Safe-D-Net

Complex Healthcare helps fill the voids in your Wound Care programs..

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What Is Congenital Disabilities?

Congenital disabilities are those that are present at birth. Because the nature of their acquisition differs from that of disabilities acquired later in life, the sociological issues involved are different as well.

This introduction will include a brief discussion of the biomedical nature of such disabilities but will focus on the sociological implications of disability that is present early in life. From a biological or medical perspective, congenital disabilities include those that are the result of genetic inheritance or mutation or of environmental factors during pregnancy or the perinatal period, such as the mother’s alcohol intake or oxygen deprivation during delivery. Genetically based impairments include conditions such as Down syndrome and other chromosome-linked forms of intellectual disability; syndromes that affect appearance, such as dwarfism; and some forms of blindness and deafness.

Environmentally induced impairments include some instances of spina bifida, limb deformities (such as those connected with the drug thalidomide), fetal alcohol syndrome, and other conditions. A common congenital impairment with a variety of possible causes is cerebral palsy. Most childhood disability is congenital. Whether congenital or not, visible impairments may create sociological consequences for those who have them. These consequences include stigma and associated interactional difficulties, lack of access to certain locations and situations, and economic constraints, among others. Unlike disabilities acquired later in life, however, congenital disabilities create special issues for families.

These include obtaining diagnostic and prognostic information from professionals and ethical decision making in the case of life-threatening conditions. Such decision making is related to perceptions regarding the quality of life of affected children. Although they face many barriers in their quest for “normalization,” most families of children with congenital disabilities eventually find the services and supports they need. The children, as well, learn to negotiate their environments to “fit in” with “normal” society. In adulthood, some individuals move beyond “normalization” and come to adopt the view associated with the disability rights movement that disability is a normal form of human variation and that society needs to change to accommodate individual differences. Studies of children with congenital disabilities suggest that their quality of life and self-esteem generally do not differ significantly from those of their nondisabled peers.

What Are the Most Common Congenital Disorders?

Some common congenital disorders are:

cleft lip and cleft palate — usually diagnosed during routine scans in pregnancy

congenital heart disease ­— including a hole in the heart, a valve problem or a problem with the blood vessels. These are usually diagnosed during routine scans in pregnancy or during newborn screening.

cerebral palsy — usually diagnosed in the first few years of life

Fragile X syndrome — may be diagnosed through genetic testing during pregnancy or in the first few years of life

Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) — usually diagnosed through genetic during pregnancy

spina bifida — usually diagnosed during routine scans in pregnancy

cystic fibrosis — usually diagnosed during newborn screening

Can Congenital Disorders Be Prevented?

If you have a personal or family history of certain congenital disorders, you can have genetic tests before you become pregnant. You may wish to meet with a genetic counsellor to discuss your family history, the likelihood your baby will have any congenital disorders, and possibly to arrange to have genetic testing.

If you are having in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment, your embryo can be tested at 2 to 4 days old, before it is implanted into your uterus.

Other things you can do to try to prevent congenital disorders include:

eating a healthy diet with enough vitamins and minerals, in particular folic acid, during the reproductive years

taking folic acid supplements before you become pregnant and for the first trimester of pregnancy

avoiding alcohol, smoking and other drugs because these can harm the fetus

controlling diabetes and gestational diabetes

avoiding exposure to chemicals in your environment, such as pesticides or lead

being vaccinated, especially against rubella

To make an appointment with a specialist osteoradionecrosis and radiation therapist in Complex Health Care Solution, submit your appointment request or call us at +1-817-386-8886.

What Is Congenital Disabilities?

Congenital disabilities are those that are present at birth. Because the nature of their acquisition differs from that of disabilities acquired later in life, the sociological issues involved are different as well.

This introduction will include a brief discussion of the biomedical nature of such disabilities but will focus on the sociological implications of disability that is present early in life. From a biological or medical perspective, congenital disabilities include those that are the result of genetic inheritance or mutation or of environmental factors during pregnancy or the perinatal period, such as the mother’s alcohol intake or oxygen deprivation during delivery. Genetically based impairments include conditions such as Down syndrome and other chromosome-linked forms of intellectual disability; syndromes that affect appearance, such as dwarfism; and some forms of blindness and deafness.

Environmentally induced impairments include some instances of spina bifida, limb deformities (such as those connected with the drug thalidomide), fetal alcohol syndrome, and other conditions. A common congenital impairment with a variety of possible causes is cerebral palsy. Most childhood disability is congenital. Whether congenital or not, visible impairments may create sociological consequences for those who have them. These consequences include stigma and associated interactional difficulties, lack of access to certain locations and situations, and economic constraints, among others. Unlike disabilities acquired later in life, however, congenital disabilities create special issues for families.

These include obtaining diagnostic and prognostic information from professionals and ethical decision making in the case of life-threatening conditions. Such decision making is related to perceptions regarding the quality of life of affected children. Although they face many barriers in their quest for “normalization,” most families of children with congenital disabilities eventually find the services and supports they need. The children, as well, learn to negotiate their environments to “fit in” with “normal” society. In adulthood, some individuals move beyond “normalization” and come to adopt the view associated with the disability rights movement that disability is a normal form of human variation and that society needs to change to accommodate individual differences. Studies of children with congenital disabilities suggest that their quality of life and self-esteem generally do not differ significantly from those of their nondisabled peers.

Some common congenital disorders are:

cleft lip and cleft palate — usually diagnosed during routine scans in pregnancy

congenital heart disease ­— including a hole in the heart, a valve problem or a problem with the blood vessels. These are usually diagnosed during routine scans in pregnancy or during newborn screening.

cerebral palsy — usually diagnosed in the first few years of life

Fragile X syndrome — may be diagnosed through genetic testing during pregnancy or in the first few years of life

Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) — usually diagnosed through genetic during pregnancy

spina bifida — usually diagnosed during routine scans in pregnancy

cystic fibrosis — usually diagnosed during newborn screening

If you have a personal or family history of certain congenital disorders, you can have genetic tests before you become pregnant. You may wish to meet with a genetic counsellor to discuss your family history, the likelihood your baby will have any congenital disorders, and possibly to arrange to have genetic testing.

If you are having in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment, your embryo can be tested at 2 to 4 days old, before it is implanted into your uterus.

Other things you can do to try to prevent congenital disorders include:

eating a healthy diet with enough vitamins and minerals, in particular folic acid, during the reproductive years

taking folic acid supplements before you become pregnant and for the first trimester of pregnancy

avoiding alcohol, smoking and other drugs because these can harm the fetus

controlling diabetes and gestational diabetes

avoiding exposure to chemicals in your environment, such as pesticides or lead

being vaccinated, especially against rubella

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