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Acute Peripheral Arterial Insufficiency

The following are the aims of therapy for peripheral artery disease:

  • Control symptoms, such as leg pain, to make activity more bearable.
  • To lower the risk of heart attack and stroke, improve arterial health.

Aside from medication occasionally, lifestyle adjustments are part of the treatment for peripheral artery disease.

Changes in lifestyle can help with symptoms, particularly when peripheral artery disease is still in its early stages. The single most crucial action you can do to lower your chance of problems is to stop smoking. Walking or engaging in other activity on a regular basis can significantly reduce symptoms (supervised exercise training).

Medications

Your doctor can recommend medication if signs of peripheral artery disease (PAD) are present. Medications for PAD could consist of:

Cholesterol medications. Peripheral artery disease patients frequently receive statin prescriptions. Statins aid in lowering bad cholesterol and preventing the buildup of arterial plaque. The medications also reduce the risk of stroke and heart attacks. Ask your doctor what your cholesterol levels should be if you have PAD.

Blood pressure medications. Uncontrolled hypertension can harden and stiffen the arteries. The blood flow may be slowed by this. Find out which blood pressure target is ideal for you by speaking with your doctor. Your doctor can recommend drugs to lower your blood pressure if it is high.

Medications for blood sugar management. Controlling your blood sugar becomes much more crucial if you have diabetes. Discuss your blood sugar goals and how to achieve them with your healthcare practitioner.

Blood clot-preventing medications. Reduced blood flow to the limbs is connected to peripheral artery disease. Thus, medications may be administered to increase blood flow. For the purpose of preventing blood clotting, aspirin or another drug, such as clopidogrel (Plavix), may be taken.

Leg pain medications. The medication cilostazol makes blood vessels wider and thinner. Blood flow to the limbs is increased by it. Patients with peripheral artery disease who use this medication are specifically helped with their leg pain. Headaches and diarrhoea are frequent negative effects of this drug. The medicine pentoxifylline is an alternative. Although this medicine rarely causes side effects, in general it doesn’t function as effectively as cilostazol.

Operations or Other Processes

Angioplasty or surgery may occasionally be required to treat peripheral artery disease that is the cause of claudication:

Implantation of stents and angioplasties. This treatment is used to unclog blocked arteries. It is able to simultaneously diagnose and treat a clogged vessel. A thin, flexible tube (catheter) is steered to the constricted area of the artery by the medical professional. In order to open the narrowed artery and increase blood flow, a small balloon is inflated. To maintain the artery open, a tiny wire mesh tube (stent) may be inserted into the artery.

avoid surgery. Using a healthy blood vessel from another area of the body or a synthetic one, the surgeon cuts a way around the blocked artery.

Thrombolytic medication. A clot-dissolving medication may be injected directly into the afflicted artery if a blood clot is obstructing it.

 

Ready for an appointment?

At Complex Healthcare Solutions, our care team’s approach is to collaborate with your treatment to address any existing conditions you are currently suffering. Our specialists will work to create a complete treatment plan suited to you to heal and fully recover quickly.

To make an appointment with our healthcare professional and specialists, submit your appointment request or call us at +1-817-386-8886.

Acute Peripheral Arterial Insufficiency

The following are the aims of therapy for peripheral artery disease:

  • Control symptoms, such as leg pain, to make activity more bearable.
  • To lower the risk of heart attack and stroke, improve arterial health.

Aside from medication occasionally, lifestyle adjustments are part of the treatment for peripheral artery disease.

Changes in lifestyle can help with symptoms, particularly when peripheral artery disease is still in its early stages. The single most crucial action you can do to lower your chance of problems is to stop smoking. Walking or engaging in other activity on a regular basis can significantly reduce symptoms (supervised exercise training).

Your doctor can recommend medication if signs of peripheral artery disease (PAD) are present. Medications for PAD could consist of:

Cholesterol medications. Peripheral artery disease patients frequently receive statin prescriptions. Statins aid in lowering bad cholesterol and preventing the buildup of arterial plaque. The medications also reduce the risk of stroke and heart attacks. Ask your doctor what your cholesterol levels should be if you have PAD.

Blood pressure medications. Uncontrolled hypertension can harden and stiffen the arteries. The blood flow may be slowed by this. Find out which blood pressure target is ideal for you by speaking with your doctor. Your doctor can recommend drugs to lower your blood pressure if it is high.

Medications for blood sugar management. Controlling your blood sugar becomes much more crucial if you have diabetes. Discuss your blood sugar goals and how to achieve them with your healthcare practitioner.

Blood clot-preventing medications. Reduced blood flow to the limbs is connected to peripheral artery disease. Thus, medications may be administered to increase blood flow. For the purpose of preventing blood clotting, aspirin or another drug, such as clopidogrel (Plavix), may be taken.

Leg pain medications. The medication cilostazol makes blood vessels wider and thinner. Blood flow to the limbs is increased by it. Patients with peripheral artery disease who use this medication are specifically helped with their leg pain. Headaches and diarrhoea are frequent negative effects of this drug. The medicine pentoxifylline is an alternative. Although this medicine rarely causes side effects, in general it doesn’t function as effectively as cilostazol.

Angioplasty or surgery may occasionally be required to treat peripheral artery disease that is the cause of claudication:

Implantation of stents and angioplasties. This treatment is used to unclog blocked arteries. It is able to simultaneously diagnose and treat a clogged vessel. A thin, flexible tube (catheter) is steered to the constricted area of the artery by the medical professional. In order to open the narrowed artery and increase blood flow, a small balloon is inflated. To maintain the artery open, a tiny wire mesh tube (stent) may be inserted into the artery.

avoid surgery. Using a healthy blood vessel from another area of the body or a synthetic one, the surgeon cuts a way around the blocked artery.

Thrombolytic medication. A clot-dissolving medication may be injected directly into the afflicted artery if a blood clot is obstructing it.

 

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